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001CP - Camp Peary T-shirt - FALL 2018 (Second Edition)

$95.00

Image of 001CP - Camp Peary T-shirt - FALL 2018 (Second Edition)
  • Image of 001CP - Camp Peary T-shirt - FALL 2018 (Second Edition)
  • Image of 001CP - Camp Peary T-shirt - FALL 2018 (Second Edition)
  • Image of 001CP - Camp Peary T-shirt - FALL 2018 (Second Edition)
  • Image of 001CP - Camp Peary T-shirt - FALL 2018 (Second Edition)

*****NOTE: THIS ITEM IS PRE-ORDER ONLY SO PLEASE EMAIL vforvictory1945@yahoo.com AND YOUR NAME AND SIZE WILL BE ADDED TO THE STORE. ANTICIPATED COMPLETION DATE OF 10/31/18.****

This WWII inspired t-shirt uses a replicated design from the rare leather Camp Peary souvenir patch (see fourth photo at left), recently acquired by Victory-1945, featuring a unique cartoon alternate version of the Seabee logo. The idea here was to create a Camp Peary t-shirt that could have been available at PX Depots during WWII.

This war-era tee is being offered in a limited Second Edition run of Pre-Orders only and is silk screened on a Runabout Simple Milk (off-white) t-shirt with dark navy blue water based ink (Note: Sizes S - M use a smaller scaled graphic than Sizes L - XL to maintain accurate proportions - see photo 2 where size M is at left and L is at right). Each shirt comes with a dual sided graphic hang tag, hand inked with tee specifications and the edition number, which is attached to a vintage USN brass laundry safety pin with patriotic red, white, and blue twine.

This design is 100% Made in the USA featuring the best period correct t-shirt available. Runabout Goods Simple Tee is 100% tubular cotton, pre-shunk (sanforized), with traditional 1940's fit, blind stitch hems, 3/4" bias cut rib collar with 1/8" double needle cover-stitch, and is Made in Los Angeles, CA.

****Excerpt from 119th Seabees "Time Out" Cruise Book (1945)****

GENESIS. -"You'll be sorry!" With those
ominous words ringing in their ears, 1082
embryo Seabees, destined to become the
119th Naval Construction Battalion, passed
from civilian life into the receiving center at
Camp Peary on a prophetic torrid day in
July of 1943.
"You're in the Navy, Mac. Wipe that grin
off your face and line up as your name is
called." Men who had been welders, electricians,
machinists, carpenters, plumbers, ship-fitters,
and skilled workers in every trade and
profession found themselves on a threshold
of a new life.
At 5:30 in the early darkness of the next
day, the raucous blare of the bugle- their
first reveille- awakened them. Sleepy and
confused, they were mustered and lined up.
They scarcely realized then that for the rest
of their service lives they would "sweat out"
endless lines for every occasion.
First day impressions stick with the men:
"Another physical?" Any who had hopes of
a last minute reprieve were soon disillusioned.
They were examined and tested on a speedy
assembly line basis. One word pounding in
every man's ear ... "Next." ... "Strip."
... "Put your civilian clothes in this box and
express it home." ... "Next." ... "Try this
on for fit- perfect." ... "Take a deep
breath- hold it-step down." ... "Next."
... " How d'ya wanna part it?" "On the
right, ple---." Clip, zip, clip. "Next."
. . . Allotments explained. Questions, questions,
questions ... "Next." ... Double file
march on the long trek to noon chow in new
dungarees and G. I. shoes that pinched and
grew heavier .... Beginning to feel just a
tiny bit salty .... Seen: a single file of marching
men with large P's inscribed on back of
uniforms. A recruit snickered, "First time I
knew the Navy trained paratroopers." ...
Back to stand in long lines; lines for coveralls,
lines for mattresses, lines for sea bags. Lines,
lines, lines.
Late in the afternoon, the men, confused
and exhausted, were alphabetically assigned to
platoons. Struggling with their gear from
temporary barracks to waiting trucks, most
of the men had to make two trips to lug all
the newly issued belongings. A ten minute
ride from the hill brought them to their home
for a month in "C" area.

****A brief history of Camp Peary:

During World War II, beginning in 1942, the United States Navy took over a large area on the north side of the Virginia Peninsula in York County, Virginia which became known as Camp Peary, initially for use as a Seabee training base.

The first World War II Seabee recruits were the men who helped build Boulder Dam, America's highways and New York City skyscrapers. At Naval Construction Training Centers and Advanced Base Depots established on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, Seabees were taught military discipline and the use of light arms.

At the outset of the War, the preliminary training of the Seabees had been carried out at various Naval Training Stations throughout the country. In Virginia, after completing three weeks of boot training at Camp Allen, and later its successor, Camp Peary, the Seabees were formed into construction battalions or other types of construction units. Soon, however, another mission had been identified for Camp Peary. All preliminary and advanced specialized training for Seabees was changed to be conducted at Camp Allen and Camp Bradford at Norfolk, Virginia, where both were an integral part of the Naval Operating Base.